Amitai Etzioni Working At Mcdonalds Full Essay On To Kill

Amitai Etzioni (;[1] born Werner Falk, 4 January 1929) is an Israeli-American sociologist, best known for his work on socioeconomics and communitarianism. He leads the Communitarian Network, a non-profit, non-partisan organization dedicated to support the moral, social, and political foundations of society. He was the founder of the communitarian movement in the early 1990s and established the Communitarian Network to disseminate the movement’s ideas. His writings emphasize the importance for all societies to have a carefully crafted balance between rights and responsibilities and between autonomy and order. In 2001, Etzioni was named among the top 100 American intellectuals, as measured by academic citations, in Richard Posner's book, Public Intellectuals: A Study of Decline. Etzioni is currently the Director of the Institute for Communitarian Policy Studies at George Washington University.

Early life and education[edit]

Amitai Etzioni was born Werner Falk in Cologne, Germany in 1929 to a Jewish family. Etzioni's earliest memory is being thrown out of a car in Cologne, Germany in January 1933. Etzioni was only four years old when the car he was driving in made a sharp turn and in response, he grabbed a handle that opened the door. Etzioni was pulled back into the car at the last moment by his father, but as noted in his memoir, this memory foreshadowed the upcoming doom that would overtake his homeland during the Nazi rule. Later in 1933, Etzioni and his grandparents were walking through the forest next to Frankfurt when they came upon a forest fire. Suddenly, Hitler Youth ventured into the forest riding in two trucks. Etzioni's grandparents reacted by grabbing Etzioni and hiding behind nearby trees.[2] The grandparents then took Etzioni and rushed down the hill without explaining to him what happened during their close encounter with the Nazi regime. When Etzioni had turned five, both of his parents had escaped to London to avoid the Nazi regime, which left Etzioni in the care of his grandparents.[2] Etzioni was smuggled out of Germany soon afterwards to a train station in Italy by a non-Jewish relative who soon reunited Etzioni with his parents. Etzioni was stuck with his parents in Athens, Greece unable to enter Palestine since his family was awarded a bachelor permit instead of a family permit. The family was stuck midway between Germany and Haifa for a whole year. During this year, Etzioni attended a Greek school learning the language. When the paperwork was finally resolved, Etzioni found himself in Haifa, Mandatory Palestine in the winter of 1937 where he had to learn another language, Hebrew.

It was at this time he began to go by his first name Amitai instead of Werner since the principal of Etzioni's new school strongly encouraged that Etzioni introduce himself by his Hebrew name. Etzioni's Hebrew name was printed in the front of the family Bible, which was left in Germany, so he was given the name Amitai which means truth (emet) and was the name of Jonah's father in the Old Testament.[2] Etzioni moved once again with his family to a small village, Herzliya Gimmel, which served as a base for a new emerging community called Kfar Schmaryahu. When Etzioni was eight, his family moved to the new village, Kfar Schmaryahu, where his family was assigned to a small, boxlike new house that was used as a lot for farming. In the spring of 1941, Etzioni's father left home once again to join the Jewish Brigade, which was a Jewish unit formed within the British army. Etzioni, at the age of thirteen, was struggling at school, which then caused his mother to send him to a boarding school called Ben Shemen.

The Ben Shemen teachers, upon Etzioni's graduation, recommended that he enroll in a good liberal arts high school, however, Etzioni enrolled in a vocational school near his home in Kfar Shmaryahu. Etzioni’s intent was to become an electrician. In the spring of 1946, at the age of sixteen, Etzioni dropped out of high school to join the Palmach, the elite commando force of the Haganah, the underground army of the Jewish community of Palestine, and was sent to Tel Yosef for military training.[3] During this time, young Amitai chose to fully distance himself from his past as Werner Falk and adopted the surname Etzioni.

During Etzioni's time in the Palmach, underground Jewish groups, mainly the Irgun and Lehi militias, and to a lesser extent the Palmach, were carrying out a violent campaign against the British authorities to compel them to allow more Jewish immigration to Palestine and leave the country to enable a Jewish state to be established. Etzioni participated in a Palmach operation to blow up a British radar station near Haifa being used to track ships carrying illegal Jewish immigrants attempting to enter Palestine. Etzioni's team managed to breach the fence protecting the radar station and plant and detonate a bomb, and escaped after the British shot their team leader through the head.[4] After the Israeli Declaration of Independence and the outbreak of the 1948 Arab–Israeli War, Etzioni's Palmach unit participated in the defense of Jerusalem, which was under siege by the Arab Legion. They sneaked through Arab lines and for the next few months, fought to defend Jerusalem and to open a corridor to Tel Aviv, participating in the Battles of Latrun and the establishment of the Burma Road.[5]

Following the war, Etzioni spent a year studying at an institute established by Martin Buber. In 1951 he enrolled in the Hebrew University of Jerusalem where he completed both BA (1954) and MA (1956) degrees for his studies in classical and contemporary works in sociology. In 1957 he went to the United States to study at the University of California, Berkeley, and was a research assistant to Seymour Martin Lipset. He received his PhD in sociology in 1958, completing the degree in the record time of 18 months.[6] Etzioni then remained in the United States to pursue an academic career.

Academic career[edit]

Personal life[edit]

Etzioni met Hava while studying sociology at the University in Israel,[2] who he married in 1953. Etzioni and Hava relocated to the United States in 1957. They had two sons together, Ethan born in 1958 and Oren born in 1962. In 1964, Hava and Etzioni divorced when Hava wanted to move back to Israel in order to be near her mother whereas Etzioni wanted to remain in the United States, as sociologists were plentiful in Israel.[2] In his autobiography, Etzioni writes that the divorce was one of his "gravest personal failures. We should have found a way."[2]

In 1966, Etzioni married Mexican scholar Minerva Morales. They had three sons: Michael, David, and Benjamin. Morales was raised Catholic, but converted to Judaism, Etzioni's religion. On December 20, 1985, Morales was killed in a car accident.[2] Etzioni has written of his considerable grief over the death of Morales and his son Michael.[7][2]

Work[edit]

Etzioni is the author of 24 books. In the 1960s, he was concerned with the Cuban Missile Crisis, the nuclear arms race, the Vietnam War and the criticisms of Project Apollo's cost. His early works include his published work on complex organizations called Modern Organizations in 1964. He also published The Active Society in 1968 on social organization. In the 1970s, his interests turned towards bioethics and re-industrialization. In his later works, he dealt with the ideas of the Communitarian movement in The New Golden Rule: Community and Morality in a Democratic Society in 1996.[8] Other influential books include The Moral Dimension (1988), How Patriotic is the Patriot Act: Freedom Versus Security in the Age of Terrorism (2004) and From Empire to Community: A New Approach to International Relations (2004).

Etzioni frequently appears as a commentator in the media. He championed the cause of peace in a nuclear age in The Hard Way to Peace (1962), Winning Without War (1964), and War and its Prevention (Etzioni and Wenglinsky, 1970). His recent work has addressed the social problems of modern democracies and he has advocated communitarian solutions to excessive individualism in The Spirit of Community: The Reinvention of American Society (1993) and New Communitarian Thinking (1996). Etzioni has been concerned to facilitate social movements that can sustain a liberal democracy in The Active Society: A Theory of Societal and Political Processes (1968) and A Responsive Society (1991). He criticized civil libertarians' approach on privacy, claiming it had to be balanced against public order and that ID cards or biometrics technologies could prevent ID theft, and thus enhance, rather than deteriorate, privacy (The Limits of Privacy, 1999).

Communitarianism[edit]

Etzioni's communitarianism[edit]

Etzioni's main communitarian thesis is that individual aspirations should be protected and cultivated into community efforts. Etzioni thus coined the movement Communitarianism to reflect the importance of the role the individual has within the community. He argues that communitarian thinking developed in reaction to the "me-first" attitude of the 1980s, which stressed the importance of individual wellbeing over the community. Etzioni, witnessing the deterioration of the community in response to the rise of capitalist mindsets, advocated for the agenda of communitarianism. The agenda of communitarianism is to create stronger communities that are more reflective and responsive to the needs of society, as once individuals are collectivized into their communities, the citizens are more apt to act in responsible ways. Etzioni also urged the movement to attempt to establish common ground between liberals and conservatives, thus bridging that division. In his book Radical Middle, author Mark Satin identifies Etzioni as a radical centrist communitarian.[9]

In the early to mid 1980s, communitarianism was restricted to the disciplines of Philosophy and Political Science, where the information presented concerning this new idealism was only available to those well-acquainted with sociological theory. Communitarianism took shape in response to the collapse of the Soviet Union and the Eastern Bloc where laissez faire economics gained popularity. Amitai Etzioni and William Galston, noticing an emphasis on individualism, started holding meetings to begin applying their communitarian ideals to broader social problems. Together, in 1991 the group published the quarterly journal "The Responsive Community" and formed the "Communitarian Network" in 1993. Etzioni founded the Communitarian Network, which is a nonprofit think tank based in Washington D.C. that serves as the biggest intellectual organization for the communitarian agenda.[10]

In Etzioni's view, the communitarian movement works to strengthen the ability of all aspects of the community including families and schools in order to introduce more positive values. In addition, it aims to get people involved in positive ways in all levels of the community and ensure that society progresses in an orderly fashion. These works written between 1990 and the present have given Etzioni his greatest successes and satisfactions in the public realm.[8] He also articulated an early reason-based critique of the space race (in the book The Moon-Doggle) in which he points out that unmanned space exploration yields a vastly higher scientific result-per-expenditure than a manned space program. Amitai Etzioni also coined the word "McJob" in a 1986 article for the Washington Post in which he criticizes the low skilled fast food jobs as being detrimental to youth.[11]

Criticism[edit]

In Simon Prideaux's "From Organisational Theory to the New Communitarium of Amitai Etzioni", he argues that Etzioni's communitarian methods are based upon earlier functionalist definitions of organizations. This is because his methodology fails to address any possible contradictions within the socioeconomic foundations of society. Also Etzioni's communitarian analysis uses a methodology which existed before the development of an organizational theory. According to Prideaux, Etzioni has taken the methodological influence of structural-functionalism beyond the realms of its organizational branch and fabricated it into a solution to solve the problems of modern society. Etzioni's arguments on the creation of a new communitarian society are restricted to the strengths and weaknesses he witnesses in the American society in which he has lived since the 1950s. This bias "neglects and denies the importance of differences within communities and among communities in different countries."[12] Thus, Etzioni makes the assumption in suggesting that only single identities or homogeneous communities exist. Prideaux calls Etzioni guilty of imposing his Americanized version of community on the rest of the western world.[13]

Elizabeth Frazer, in her book The Problems of Communitarian Politics: Unity and Conflict, argues that Etzioni's concept of the "nature of community" is too vague and elusive, in regards to the idea that the community is involved with every stage of government policies.[14][15] Warren Breed's The Self-Guiding Society provides a critical overview of The Active Society.[16] David Sciulli's Etzioni's Critical Functionalism: Communitarian Origins and Principles evaluates Etzioni's functionalism.[17]

Awards[edit]

  • 1960–61: Fellowship at the Social Science Research Council[18]
  • 1965–66: Fellowship at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences[19]
  • 1968–69: Guggenheim Fellowship[20]
  • 1978–present: Appointment as a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science[19]
  • 1987: The Lester F. Ward Distinguished Contributions Award in Applied Sociology[18]
  • 1991: The Ninth Annual Jeffrey Pressman Award (Policy Studies Association)[18]
  • 2001: John P. McGovern Award in Behavioral Sciences[21]
  • 2001: Officer’s Cross of the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany[22]
  • Recipient of the Seventh James Wilbur Award for Extraordinary Contributions to the Appreciation and Advancement of Human Values by the Conference on Value Inquiry[23]
  • Recipient of the Sociological Practice Association’s Outstanding Contribution Award[22]
  • 2016: Officially became a member of the National Academy of Medicine.[19]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Coughlin M. Richard (Oct 1994). "AMITAI ETZIONI". American Sociological Association. American Sociological Association. Retrieved 6 Oct 2016. 
  • Etzioni Amitai (24 August 1986). "The Fast-Food Factories: McJobs are Bad for Kids"(PDF). GWD Space. Retrieved 6 Oct 2016. 
  • Etzioni, Amitai (2 July 2002). "Throw Book at Terrorists Who Hide as Civilians". ProCon. Retrieved 7 Oct 2016. 
  • Frazer, Elizabeth (1999). The Problems of Communitarian Politics: Unity and Conflict. Oxford [England] ; New York: Oxford University Press. ISBN 9780191522529. 
  • Prideaux, Simon (2002). "From Organisational Theory to the New Communitarianism of Amitai Etzioni". Canadian Journal of Sociology. JSTOR 3341413. 
  • Satin, Mark Ivor, ed. (2007). Radical Middle: The Politics We Need Now. Boulder, Colo: Westview Press. ISBN 978-0813341903. 
  • Sciulli, David (2011). Etzioni’s Critical Functionalism: Communitarian Origins and Principles. Leiden ; Boston: Brill. ISBN 9789004190443. 
  • "Amitai Etzioni, PhD". ProCon. 2007. Retrieved 6 Oct 2016. 

Books[edit]

  • Etzioni, Amitai, ed. (1995). New communitarian thinking : persons, virtues, institutions, and communities. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia. 
  • —, ed. (1998). The essential communitarian reader. Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield. 
  • Amitai Etzioni, ed. (1 January 2000). Repentance: A Comparative Perspective. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. ISBN 978-0-585-08074-1. 
  • Political Unification Revisited: On Building Supranational Communities. Lexington Books. 1 January 2001. ISBN 978-0-7391-0273-2. 
  • The Monochrome Society. Princeton University Press. 1 January 2003. ISBN 0-691-11457-9. 
  • My Brother's Keeper: A Memoir and a Message. Rowman & Littlefield. 1 January 2003. ISBN 978-0-7425-2158-2. 
  • Security First: For a Muscular, Moral Foreign Policy. Yale University Press. 1 October 2008. ISBN 0-300-13804-0. 
  • The Limits Of Privacy. Basic Books. 5 August 2008. ISBN 978-0-7867-2505-2. 
  • Moral Dimension: Toward a New Economics. Simon and Schuster. 11 May 2010. ISBN 978-1-4391-3653-9. 
  • Hot Spots: American Foreign Policy in a Post-Human-Rights World. Transaction Publishers. 28 October 2014. pp. 72–. ISBN 978-1-4128-5546-4. 
  • The New Normal: Finding a Balance between Individual Rights and the Common Good. Transaction Publishers. 5 November 2014. ISBN 978-1-4128-5526-6. 
  • Foreign Policy: Thinking Outside the Box. Routledge. June 2016. ISBN 978-1-138-67830-9. 
  • Avoiding War with China. University of Virginia Press. May 2017. ISBN 978-0-813-940038. 
  • Happiness is the Wrong Metric. Springer. January 2018. ISBN 978-3-319-69623-2. 

Critical studies, reviews and biography[edit]

  • De Carvalho, David (Dec 1995). "The challenge of community". Books. Quadrant. 39 (12): 80–82.  Review of New communitarian thinking.

References[edit]

  1. ^BBC World News: Interview with Amitai Etzioni
  2. ^ abcdefghhttps://books.google.com/books/about/My_Brother_s_Keeper.html?id=yVgMhwKoLoQC
  3. ^http://www.haaretz.co.il/misc/1.940212
  4. ^http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/news/opinion/2002/07/03/ncguest1.htm
  5. ^My Brother's Keeper: pgs. 28–31
  6. ^My Brother's Keeper
  7. ^https://www.nytimes.com/2006/10/07/opinion/07etzioni.html
  8. ^ abStockdale, Jerry (November 2004). "Reviewed work(s): My Brother's Keeper: A Memoir and a Message by Amitai Etzioni". Contemporary Sociology. American Sociological Association. 33 (6): 702–703. doi:10.1177/009430610403300642. JSTOR 3593865. 
  9. ^Satin, Mark (2004). Radical Middle: The Politics We Need Now. Westview Press and Basic Books, p. 10. ISBN 978-0-8133-4190-3.
  10. ^List, Regina A. (2010). International Encyclopedia of Civil Society: Volume 2. Springer Science + Business Media, p. 640-641. ISBN 978-0-387-93997-1.
  11. ^Etzioni, Amitai (24 August 1986). "The Fast-Food Factories: McJobs are Bad for Kids"(PDF). The Washington post. 
  12. ^https://www.jstor.org/stable/3341413 doi:1
  13. ^Prideaux, Simon (2002). "From Organisational Theory to the New Communitarium of Amitai Etzioni". Canadian Journal of Sociology. 27 (1): 69.  SocINDEX with full text. EBSCO. web. 13 October 2009.
  14. ^http://users.ox.ac.uk/~efrazer/efrazer-/Problems,%20Pref%20and%20Intro.pdf
  15. ^Frazer, Elizabeth (1999). The Problems of Communitarian Politics: Unity and Conflict. Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-829563-1. 
  16. ^Breed, Warren (1971). The Self-Guiding Society. Free Press. ISBN 978-0-02-904650-0. 
  17. ^Sciulli, David (2011). Etzioni's Critical Functionalism: Communitarian Origins and Principles. Brill Academic Publishers. ISBN 978-90-04-19043-6. 
  18. ^ abchttp://www.asanet.org/about-asa/asa-story/asa-history/past-asa-officers/past-asa-presidents/amitai-etzioni
  19. ^ abchttps://www2.gwu.edu/~ccps/etzioni/general_biography_information.html
  20. ^http://www.gf.org/fellows/all-fellows/amitai-etzioni/
  21. ^https://www.aslme.org/media/speaker_bio.php?speaker_id=131
  22. ^ abhttps://www2.gwu.edu/~ccps/etzioni/short_biography.html
  23. ^http://euthanasia.procon.org/view.source.php?sourceID=001059

Further reading[edit]

  • Boykoff, Jules "How Patriotic is the Patriot Act?: Freedom Versus Security in the Age of Terrorism-Amitai Etzioni." Journal of Politics 68.2 (2006): 470–471 Academic Search Premier. EBSCO. web.14 oct 2009
  • Marks, Jonathan. "Moral Dialogue in the thought of Amitai Etzioni." Good Society Journal, 2005, Vol. 14 Issue 1/2, p. 15–18, 4p; (M1834886).
  • Jennings, Lane. "Who's Afraid of a Moral Society?" Futurist 35,60. (2001):52. Academic Search Premier. EBSCO. Web. 14 Oct 2009.
  • Etzioni, Amitai. The Spirit of Community: rights, responsibilities, and the communitarian agenda. New York: Crown Publishers, 1993. ISBN 0-517-59277-0
  • Gvosdev, Nikolas. Communitarian Foreign Policy: Amitai Etzioni's Vision. 2016. New Brunswick: Transaction Publishers.
  • Reese-Schaefer, Walter . "Amitai Etzioni: An Introduction." Translated by Morgan Hangartner.
  • Breed, Warren and Etzioni, Amitai. "The Self-Guiding Society" 1971. Free Press.

External links[edit]

Essays

Opioids and Paternalism

David Brown

To help end the crisis, both doctors and patients need to find a new way to think about pain

Still Wilderness

Christian Wiman

What are we feeling when we are feeling joy? And where inside us does that feeling reside?

Against Solidarity

Emily Fox Gordon

As a writer, with a writer’s chronic need for detachment, I have avoided the ideology of gender

Urban Wild

Laura Bernstein-Machlay

In slowly gentrifying Detroit, you might see a fox, or even a coyote, but where have all the stray dogs gone?

A Jane Austen Kind of Guy

William Deresiewicz

I get it that women find my affinity for their writer intrusive, but her world has much to offer men, too

Our Nuclear Future

Jeffrey Lewis

We may think the bomb is back, but it never really went away

Dishonorable Behavior

Elizabeth D. Samet

The scourge of military sexual assault and the warrior’s masculine code

Reading Thoreau at 200

William Howarth

Why is the seminal work of the great American transcendentalist held in such scorn today?

My Mongolian Spot

Jennifer Hope Choi

An ephemeral birthmark is a rare gift, connecting me to generations spanning the centuries

Things Sweet to Taste

Leslie Stainton

Much to my regret, I never truly knew the woman who helped raise me

Goodbye to Westbrook Acres

Andrew Hudgins

As a writer walks and muses, the world’s sorrows intrude upon the peaceful streets he will be leaving

A Brief History of Secession

Richard Striner

Why Calexit might not be as crazy as you think

On Political Correctness

William Deresiewicz

Power, class, and the new campus religion

Interstates

Emily Bernard

How My Italian-American husband ate his way into the good graces of my African-American family

The Cloistered Books of Peru

Helen Hazen

A convent in the Andes is home to a treasure trove of rare, and possibly unique, early volumes

Keeping Faith

Mark Lane

After a loss from which there is no recovery, I turned to books—not for solace or forgetting, but simply to survive

The Ultimate Pawn Sacrifice

Jay Neugeboren

My brother’s life mirrored that of Bobby Fischer, the deeply troubled chess master

“We Must Not Be Enemies”

Amitai Etzioni

Progressives who wish for a less reactionary America could begin by trying to understand the Trump voter

Milton Friedman’s Misadventures in China

Julian B. Gewirtz

The stubborn advocate of free markets tangles with the ideologues of a state-run economy

The Life Unlived

André Aciman

On W. G. Sebald and the uncertainties of time

Good Neighbors

Tamara Dean

When beavers came between us and a farmer down the road, we knew something more was at stake

Homebodies

Kyoko Mori

A life spent mainly in the company of cats has meant relishing the comforts of domesticity and solitude

Tales From Motor City

Laura Bernstein-Machlay

Left for dead yet pulsing with life again, Detroit survives as a place of inconsistency and contradiction

The Last Bursts of Memory

James VanOosting

As my father’s dementia progressed, the stories of his life became less accurate but more vivid

The Virtue of an Educated Voter

Alan Taylor

The Founders believed that a well-informed electorate preserves our fragile democracy and benefits American society as a whole

Chicago Hope

Lincoln Caplan

Can the collaboration between a progressive boarding school and a big-city charter academy transform American Public High School Education?

Writing the Unimaginable

Amitav Ghosh

When future generations look back at the fiction of our time, what will they make of the failure to address the crisis of climate change?

Put a Bird on It

Erik Anderson

How did a beguiling South American hummingbird end up in the basement of a Pennsylvania museum?

Turbulence

Brandon Lingle

Death can come at any time, from above or below, but life requires putting fear aside

Thine as Ever, P. T. Barnum

A. H. Saxon

A scholar offers three utterly fictitious letters he wishes the famous showman had written

Little Bowls of Colors

Ewa Hryniewicz-Yarbrough

Writing in a foreign language can reveal secrets long buried in our mother tongue

The Taming of the Wild

David Gessner

As we celebrate the centenary of the National Park Service, a meditation on “the best idea that America ever had”

The FBI, My Husband, and Me

Shirley Streshinsky

What I know now about Ted, whose photographs documented the 1960s, and about J. Edgar Hoover’s attempts to label him a Soviet spy

The Truth About Dallas

Howard P. Willens and Richard M. Mosk

Looking back at the investigation of the Kennedy assassination and the controversies that dogged it from the start

The Other Woman

Sheila Kohler

A mother’s devastating secret, and its many reverberations, present and past

Flight Behavior

Amy Butcher

A restless traveler finds solace in the quiet beauty of the annual sandhill crane migration

Waiting for Fire

James Conaway

As smoke thickens and ash falls, an esteemed Napa vintner prepares to save his home and livelihood

Common Sense

Robert Wilson

It’s time for police officers to start demanding gun laws that could end up saving their own lives

Saving the Self in the Age of the Selfie

James McWilliams

We must learn to humanize digital life as actively as we’ve digitized human life—here’s how

A New Heaven and a New Earth

Adam Hochschild

During the Spanish Civil War, an alternative vision of society briefly flourished in Barcelona

I Will Love You in the Summertime

Christian Wiman

Between the rupture of life and the rapture of language lies a world of awe and witness

The Remains of My Days

Doris Grumbach

Fond and fading memories of a robust literary life

Meditation on a Rat

Lucy Ferriss

Who would have thought that this unlikely creature could help make a family whole again?

Kindly Nervous

Lee Smith

My sweet, gentle parents had their demons, but they kept me safe

Medication Nation

Philip Alcabes

Our increasing reliance on drugs—prescribed, over-the-counter, illegal, and ordered online like pizza—suggests we have a deeper problem

How Chemistry Became Biology

Priscilla Long

And how LUCA, Earth’s first living cell, became Lucas, my adorable grandnephew

Awakenings

Susan Jacoby

The advent of new religions in the 1800s led to fierce debates that persist today

My Newfoundland

Paul West

The sensations of landing on the island long ago haunted a writer’s final memories

A Life in Letters

Merrill Joan Gerber

A decades-long correspondence with the Italian writer Arturo Vivante covered it all: hardship, love, and the endurance of art

Where the Heart Is

Leslie Berlin

A grandmother’s life in five moves, from Hitler’s Europe to the American Midwest

The Well Curve

Harriet A. Washington

Tropical diseases are undermining intellectual development in countries with poor health care—and they’re coming here next

The Sweet Briar Opportunity

Carol T. Christ

Small colleges with too few applicants and large universities with too many should work together

Hope Is the Enemy

Dasha Kiper

Caring for a patient suffering from dementia means coming to terms with the frustrating paradoxes of memory and language

The Mysteries of Attraction

Edward Hoagland

Its many splendors do not only include the carnal: animate, inanimate … love it all

Capital of Willows

Eben Wood

On a trip to North Korea, a writer remembers his troubled father, a victim of the “Forgotten War”

Test of Faith

Mark Edmundson

The Roman Catholic Church may forgive us our sins—but can it be forgiven for its own?

The Examined Lie

James McWilliams

A meditation on memory

Talk of the Town

Robert A. Gross

At the Concord Lyceum, Emerson tried out his lectures on his neighbors

Matters of Taste

Paul Lukacs

A work of literature and a bottle of wine require similar skills of their respective critics

The Wandering Years

Lawrence Ferlinghetti

The travel journals of a literary icon making his way in the world

My Mother’s Yiddish

Phyllis Rose

The music of my childhood was a language filled with endearments and rebukes, and frequent misunderstandings

Net Gains

Robert Roper

Nabokov's profitable summer chasing butterflies and settling scores in the Utah mountains

Saigon Summer

Sarah Mansfield Taber

A spy’s daughter remembers the haunting unreality of embassy life in South Vietnam before the fall

How to Write a Memoir

William Zinsser

Be yourself, speak freely, and think small

The Embattled First Amendment

Lincoln Caplan

The Supreme Court is interpreting free speech in new ways that threaten our democracy

A Terrible Loss

Jonathan W. White

Lincoln’s assassination 150 years ago turned plans for postwar reconciliation to a frenzy of violence

Kill the Creature

Christian Wiman

In search of snakes—and the balm of charity and love in a world of infinitely lonely space

Confessing and Confiding

Emily Fox Gordon

Knowing the difference between the two can elevate an essay from therapy to art

Failure to Heal

Philip Alcabes

Today’s medical industry thrives on diagnosing and curing, but it doesn’t reach the soul

Meeting the Mystics

Sissela Bok

My California encounters with Gerald Heard and Aldous Huxley

School Reform Fails the Test

Mike Rose

How can our schools get better when we’ve made our teachers the problem and not the solution?

Habits of Mind

Anthony Grafton and James Grossman

Why college students who do serious historical research become independent, analytical thinkers

What I Have Taught—and Learned

William M. Chace

After 50 years as a professor, I understand that my job is to make students think hard about thinking

Remains

Donald Hall

As the forest reclaims large stretches of New Hampshire, animals come and go, as do memories of a beloved 19th-century farmhouse

For Better and for Worse

Clellan Coe

The aftermath of a disorienting divorce

Traveling Corpse

Andrea Barrett

How an American sergeant’s journey through frigid North Russia inspired a work of historical fiction

Instant Gratification

Paul Roberts

As the economy gets ever better at satisfying our immediate, self-serving needs, who is minding the future?

Why Science Is Not Enough

John Lukacs

Only through our imagination can we know the world

Going Haywire

Richard Restak

Delusions can occur in perfectly “normal” people

Frankfurt, Farewell

Werner Gundersheimer

A family escaped the Nazis in 1939, finding refuge in America, but its hardships were far from over

Silences

Sheila Kohler

A South African family of privilege kept its secrets

A Tale of War and Forgetting

Neil Shea

Rescuing the memory of a cataclysm

The Fear Factor

Lincoln Caplan

Long-held predictions of economic chaos as baby boomers grow old are based on formulas that are just plain wrong

4 Popes, 4 Saints, One New Guy

Ingrid D. Rowland

Perhaps you’ve heard the news from Rome. But what does it really have to do with the man from Assisi?

Keep Smiling

Jan Morris

An agnostic sermon

On Visitors

Ann Beattie

When the Bachelor Girl and the Red Death come calling, are they mirrors for our eccentricities?

Proust Goes to the Country Club

Willard Spiegelman

At a largely forgettable class reunion, remembrances of things past

A Prophet Without Honor

Alex Beam

There’s no authoritative biography yet for Joseph Smith, the notorious founding figure in Mormonism

Loving Animals to Death

James McWilliams

How can we raise them humanely and then butcher them?

What Killed My Sister?

Priscilla Long

The answer—schizophrenia—only leads to more perplexing questions

On Loneliness

Edward Hoagland

We value our solitude until it pinches

The Making of PoBiz Farm

Maxine Kumin

After it became our permanent home, we overfilled it with overloved horses and dogs

The Presence of Absence

Bethany Vaccaro

Our losses give vitality to our lives

A Whole Day Nearer Now

Doris Grumbach

But all life’s passion not quite spent

Where Are the People?

Jim Hinch

Evangelical Christianity in America is losing its power—what happened to Orange County’s Crystal Cathedral shows why

My Kingdom for a Wave

Amitai Etzioni

If your life as a public intellectual takes you to the highest crests, be prepared for the troughs that follow

My Friend Melanie Has Breast Cancer

Anna Blackmon Moore

How it might have happened, and why we are looking in the wrong places to prevent similar cases

Homeless in the City

Theodore Walther

A writer describes the decade he has spent living on the streets

Our Farm, My Inspiration

Maxine Kumin

How a weekend getaway became a poet’s muse

Tutors

Paul West

My many mentors at Oxford, from Lincoln College to All Souls, linger like spirits in the mind

At Sixty-Five

Emily Fox Gordon

After the excesses of youth and terrors of middle age, a writer faces the contingencies of being old

One Road

Donald Hall

Driving through postwar Yugoslavia was nearly impossible, but a young poet and his new wife struggled through the desolate landscape to Athens

Kodachrome Eden

James Santel

With purple prose and oversaturated images, National Geographic reimagined postwar America as a dreamspace of hope and fascination

On Friendship

Edward Hoagland

The intimacies shared with our closest companions keep us anchored, vital, and alive

Mortify Our Wolves

Christian Wiman

The struggle back to life and faith in the face of pain and the certainty of death

Joyas Voladoras

Brian Doyle

Brian Doyle, who died on May 27, considers the capacity of the heart—including his own. Rest in peace.

Rites of Passage

Steve Macone

When a quirky old man who lived on the Cape died, I thought I didn’t care

The Complete Zinsser on Friday

William Zinsser

Congratulations to William Zinsser, winner of the 2012 National Magazine Award in the category of Digital Commentary

Affirmative Inaction

William M. Chace

Opposition to affirmative action has drastically reduced minority enrollment at public universities; private institutions have the power and the responsibility to reverse the trend

A Jew in the Northwest

William Deresiewicz

Exile, ethnicity, and the search for the perfect futon

Dubya and Me

Walt Harrington

Over the course of a quarter-century, a journalist witnessed the transformation of George W. Bush

LBJ’s Wild Ride

Ernest B. Furgurson

Hanging on for dear life during the 1960 campaign

The Psychologist

Brian Boyd

Vladimir Nabokov's understanding of human nature anticipated the advances in psychology since his day

Scar Tissue

Emily Bernard

When I was stabbed 17 years ago in a New Haven coffee shop, the wounds did not only come from the knife

A Mother’s Secret

Werner Gundersheimer

The images in a treasured photo album preserve an idealized past, while leaving out the painful story of a family torn apart by the Holocaust

Making Sparks Fly

Mike Rose

How occupational education can lead to a love of learning for its own sake

In the Orbit of Copernicus

Owen Gingerich

A discovery of the great astronomer's bones, and their reburial in Poland

Plunging to Earth

Robert Zaretsky

Once the sport of daredevils, skydiving now offers it existential thrills to grandmothers, pudgy geeks, and even the occasional college professor

The Forgotten Churchill

George Watson

The man who stared down Hitler also helped create the modern welfare state

Plucked from the Grave

Debra Gwartney

The first female missionary to cross the Continental Divide came to a gruesome end partly caused by her own zeal. What can we learn from her?

Civil Warfare in the Streets

Adam Goodheart

After Fort Sumter, German immigrants in St. Louis flocked to the Union cause and in bloody confrontations overthrew the local secessionists

How Longfellow Woke the Dead

Jill Lepore

When first published 150 years ago, his famous poem about Paul Revere was read as a bold statement of his opposition to slavery

Interview with a Neandertal

Priscilla Long

What I always wanted to ask our distant cousins about love and death and sorrow and dinner

‘I Tried to Stop the Bloody Thing’

Adam Hochschild

In World War I, nearly as many British men refused the draft—20,000—as were killed on the Somme's first day. Why were those who fought for peace forgotten?

The View from 90

Doris Grumbach

Even when those in my generation have reached a state of serenity, wisdom, and relative comfort, what we face can hardly be called the golden years

Baseball’s Loss of Innocence

Diana Goetsch

When the 1919 Black Sox scandal shattered Ring Lardner’s reverence for the game, the great sportswriter took a permanent walk

Unauthorized, But Not Untrue

Kitty Kelley

The real story of a biographer in a celebrity culture of public denials, media timidity, and legal threats

Empathy and Other Mysteries

Richard Restak

Neuroscientists are discovering things about the brain that answer questions philosophers have been asking for centuries

To Accept What Cannot Be Helped

Ann Hulbert

At 80, a woman with a fatal disease knows she doesn't want to die in the hospital and discovers, with her family, what that really means

The Seduction

Paula Marantz Cohen

After years of favoring the endurance-test approach to teaching literature, a professor focuses on how to make books spark to life for her students

The Passionate Encounter

Alfred Kazin

A noted midcentury critic has much to say in his journal about his fellow writers and the literary world they shared

Reassessing Rossellini

Joseph Luzzi

Restoration of Rome Open city, the director’s masterpiece, prompts a look at why he later retreated from the neorealism it introduced

Prozac for the Planet

Christopher Cokinos

Can geoengineering make the climate happy?

Every Last One

Brad Edmondson

A guy with a weakness for demography goes door to door for the census and discovers what a democracy is made of

Wonderlust

Tony Hiss

"Deep Travel" opens our minds to the rich possibilities of ordinary experience

Blowdown

Tamara Dean

When a tornado tears through a beloved landscape, is it possible to just let nature heal itself?

We’ll Always Have McSorley’s

Robert Day

How Joseph Mitchell's wonderful saloon became a sacred site for a certain literary pilgrim

What the Earth Knows

Robert B. Laughlin

Understanding the concept of geologic time and some basic science can give a new perspective on climate change and the energy future

All Style, No Substance

Amitai Etzioni

What’s wrong with the State Department’s public diplomacy effort

Too Bad Not to Fail

William J. Quirk

Just what are derivatives, and how much more damage can they do?

Voices of a Nation

Brenda Wineapple

In the 19th century, American writers struggled to discover who they were and who we are

Hive of Nerves

Christian Wiman

To be alive spiritually is to feel the ultimate anxiety of existence within the trivial anxieties of everyday life

The Bearable Lightness of Being

Ewa Hryniewicz-Yarbrough

If you live long enough and contentedly enough in exile, your feelings of estrangement can evolve into a sense of living two lives at once

Solitude and Leadership

William Deresiewicz

If you want others to follow, learn to be alone with your thoughts

Reading in a Digital Age

Sven Birkerts

Notes on why the novel and the Internet are opposites, and why the latter both undermines the former and makes it more necessary

Nabokov Lives On

Brian Boyd

Why his unfinished novel, Laura, deserved to be published; what’s left in the voluminous archive of his unpublished work

They Get to Me

Jessica Love

A young psycholinguist confesses her strong attraction to pronouns

When the Light Goes On

Mike Rose

How a great teacher can bring a receptive mind to life

To Die of Having Lived

Richard Rapport

A neurological surgeon reflects on what patients and their families should and should not do when the end draws near

My Brain on My Mind

Priscilla Long

The ABCs of the thrumming, plastic mystery that allows us to think, feel, and remember

The Stolen Election

Gelareh Asayesh

An expatriate Iranian writer travels her troubled homeland in the weeks after a disputed presidential vote

Seventy Years Later

John Lukacs

The Second World War destroyed Adolf Hitler, but his legacy is showing disturbing signs of life

Strange Matter

John Olson

The physics and poetics of the search for the God particle

Wrestling with Two Behemoths

Ved Mehta

A longtime New Yorker, and New Yorker writer, gets the cold shoulder from powerful New York cultural institutions

Writing About Writers

Bob Thompson

Covering the book beat

The Doctor Is IN

Daniel B. Smith

At 88, Aaron Beck is now revered for an approach to psychotherapy that pushed Freudian analysis aside

A Mindful Beauty

Joel E. Cohen

What poetry and applied mathematics have in common

Armchair Travelers

Toby Lester

The Renaissance writers and humanists Petrarch and Boccaccio turned to geography to understand the works of antiquity

Mother Country

Evelyn Toynton

A daughter examines a life played out in romantic defiance of bad fortune

Not Ready for Mt. Rushmore

Matthew Dallek

Reconciling the myth of Ronald Reagan with the reality

Shock Waves

Bethany Vaccaro

A blast in Baghdad tests the endurance of a soldier and his family

The Devil You Know

John B. Renehan

Keeping the peace in Ramadi calls for a little moral dexterity

Blue-Collar Brilliance

Mike Rose

Questioning assumptions about intelligence, work, and social class

Enough Already

Mark Edmundson

What I'd really like to tell the bores in my life

Words Apart

Witold Rybczynski

A writer in Quebec finds that language creates an unbridgeable divide

Any Way You Slice It

Rob Gurwitt

Sundays at the community oven aren't just about the pizza

Saratoga Bill

Zachary Sklar

He bet cautiously at the track, but elsewhere he was drawn to those with the odds stacked against them

The Terminator Comes to Wall Street

Joseph Fuller

How computer modeling worsened the financial crisis and what we ought to do about it

Purpose-Driven Life

Brian Boyd

Evolution does not rob life of meaning, but creates meaning. It also makes possible our own capacity for creativity.

Second Chances, Social Forgiveness, and the Internet

Amitai Etzioni

We need the means, both technological and legal, to replace measures once woven into the fabric of communities

The Potency of Breathless

Paula Marantz Cohen

At 50, Godard’s film still asks how something this bad can be so good

The Man Who Shot the Man Who Shot Lincoln

Ernest B. Furgurson

The hatter Boston Corbett was celebrated as a hero for killing John Wilkes Booth. Fame and fortune did not follow, but madness did.

Visions and Revisions

William Zinsser

Writing On Writing Well and keeping it up-to-date for 35 years

Dawn of a Literary Friendship

John McIntyre

In 1969 the writer Robert Phelps first wrote to the novelist James Salter. Here are the letters that forged a bond of two decades.

The Dowser Dilemma

Kate Daloz

How a town in Vermont found water it desperately needed and an explanation that was harder to swallow

Putting Man Before Descartes

John Lukacs

Human knowledge is personal and participant—placing us at the center of the universe

The Future of the American Frontier

John Tirman

Can one of our most enduring national myths, much in evidence in the recent presidential campaign, be reinvented yet again?

Affirmative Action and After

W. Ralph Eubanks

Now is the time to reconsider a policy that must eventually change. But simply replacing race with class isn’t the solution.

Spies Among Us

Clay Risen

Military snooping on civilians, which escalated in the turbulent '60s, never entirely went away and is back again on a much larger scale

A Country for Old Men

Edward Hoagland

Having reached the shores of seniority himself, the author finds a surprising contentment in the eyes of his fellow retirees

Collateral Damage

Robert Roper

The Civil War only enhanced George Whitman's soldierly satisfaction; for his brother Walt, however, the horrors halted an outpouring of great poetry

My Bright Abyss

Christian Wiman

I never felt the pain of unbelief until I believed. But belief itself is hardly painless.

The High Road to Narnia

George Watson

C. S. Lewis and his friend J. R. R. Tolkien believed that truths are universal and that stories reveal them

The Censor in the Mirror

Ha Jin

It’s not only what the Chinese Propaganda Department does to artists, but what it makes artists do to their own work

The Torture Colony

Bruce Falconer

In a remote part of Chile, an evil German evangelist built a utopia whose members helped the Pinochet regime perform its foulest deeds

Where Does American History Begin?

Ted Widmer

Mixing geography with invention, the first explorers and mapmakers made the New World a very hard place to pin down

Something Called Terrorism

Leonard Bernstein

In a speech given at Harvard 22 years ago and never before published, Leonard Bernstein offered a warning that remains timely

The New Old Way of Learning Languages

Ernest Blum

Now all but vanished, a once-popular system of reading Greek and Latin classics could revitalize modern teaching methods

The Disadvantages of an Elite Education

William Deresiewicz

Our best universities have forgotten that the reason they exist is to make minds, not careers

The End of the Black American Narrative

Charles Johnson

A new century calls for new stories grounded in the present, leaving behind the painful history of slavery and its consequences

Intimacy

André Aciman

Revisiting the gritty Roman neighborhood of his youth, a writer discovers a world of his own invention

Pullovers

Kyoko Mori

Knitting a new life in America after a mother’s suicide, long ago in Japan

The Bout

Blair Fuller

When George Plimpton, the boyish editor of The Paris Review, went three rounds with the light-heavyweight champion of the world

Buoyancy

Willard Spiegelman

In literature, as in life, the art of swimming isn’t hard to master

The Broken Balance

Edward Hoagland

The poet Robinson Jeffers warned us nearly a century ago of the ravages to nature we now face

Passing the Torch

Stephen J. Pyne

Why the eons-old truce between humans and fire has burst into an age of megafires, and what can be done about it

The Liberal Imagination of Frederick Douglass

Nick Bromell

Honoring the emotions that give life to liberal principles

What Kind of Father Am I?

James McConkey

Looking back at a lifetime of parenting sons and being parented by them

Rome’s Gossip Columnist

Garry Wills

When the first-century poet Martial turned his stylus on you, you got the point

Shipwrecked

Janna Malamud Smith

Like Robinson Crusoe after the storm, a daughter salvages what she can after her mother’s death

A Slow Devouring

Steve Macone

Banter, beer, and bar food smooth a disciplined but difficult passage through Finnegans Wake

Who Cares About Executive Supremacy?

Lincoln Caplan

The scope of presidential power is the most urgent and the most ignored legal and political issue of our time

Moral Principle vs. Military Necessity

David Bosco

The first code of conduct during warfare, created by a Civil War–era Prussian immigrant, reflected ambiguities we struggle with to this day

Dreaming of a Democratic Russia

Sarah E. Mendelson

Memories of a year in Moscow promoting a post-Soviet political process, an undertaking that now seems futile

The Daily Miracle

William Zinsser

Life with the mavericks and oddballs at the Herald Tribune

Cuss Time

Jill McCorkle

By limiting freedom of expression, we take away thoughts and ideas before they have the opportunity to hatch

Alone at the Movies

Mark Edmundson

My days in the dark with Robert Altman and Woody Allen

Balanchine’s Cabinet

Ann Hagman Cardinal

A young woman wins a drawing and learns to give and to receive

Confluences

Jennifer Sinor

As a beloved uncle makes his final journey in the wilderness, a new life begins

The Cradle of Modernism

Jacques Barzun

From the Autumn 1990 issue of The Scholar

Findings: Meditations on the Literature of Spying

Jacques Barzun

From the Spring 1965 issue of The Scholar

To the Rescue of Romanticism

Jacques Barzun

From the Spring 1940 issue of The Scholar

Wonder Bread

Melvin Jules Bukiet

Come with us to a place called Brooklyn, where the stories are half-baked and their endings bland and soft

Unto Caesar

Ethan Fishman

Religious groups that have allied themselves with politicians, and vice versa, have ignored at their peril the lessons of Roger Williams and U.S. history

The Trojan War

William Nichols

Now even some environmentalists are supporting the use of nuclear power to generate electricity. One man’s story suggests the industry can’t be trusted

Poetry Stand

Diana Goetsch

How a precocious group of high school poets learned to provide verse on demand

Lady of the Lake

Alice Kaplan

Writer Brenda Ueland and the story she never shared

Apologies All Around

Gorman Beauchamp

Today's tendency to make amends for the crimes of history raises the question: where do we stop?

Findings: Amateurism

William Haley

From the Spring 1976 issue of The Scholar

The Mystery of Ales

Kai Bird and Svetlana Chervonnaya

The argument that Alger Hiss was a WWII-era Soviet asset is flawed. New evidence points to someone else

The Mystery of Ales (Expanded Version)

Kai Bird and Svetlana Chervonnaya

The argument that Alger Hiss was a WWII-era Soviet asset is flawed. New evidence points to someone else

Love on Campus

William Deresiewicz

Why we should understand, and even encourage, a certain sort of erotic intensity between student and professor

Remember Statecraft?

Dennis Ross

What diplomacy can do and why we need it more than ever

Gazing Into the Abyss

Christian Wiman

The sudden appearance of love and the galvanizing prospect of death lead a young poet back to poetry and a “hope toward God”

‘Mem, Mem, Mem’

Paul West

After a stroke, a prolific novelist struggles to say how the mental world of aphasia looks and feels

Between Two Worlds

Christopher Clausen

The familar story of Pocahontas was mirrored by that of a young Englishman given as a hostage to her father

The Invasion of Privacy

Richard H. Rovere

From the Autumn 1958 issue of The Scholar

A New Theory of the Universe

Robert Lanza

Biocentrism builds on quantum physics by putting life into the equation

When 2+2=5

Robert Orsi

Can we begin to think about unexplained religious experiences in ways that acknowledge their existence?

In Pursuit of Innocence

Paul Sears

From the Spring 1953 issue of The Scholar

The Judge's Jokes

John Barth

Shards of memory, for better or for worse, from my father the after-banquet speaker

The Apologist

Michael McDonald

The celebrated Austrian writer Peter Handke appeared at the funeral of Serbian dictator Slobodan Milosevic. Should we forgive him?

The Cook's Son

Frank Huyler

The death of a young man, long ago in Africa, continues to raise questions with no answers

One Day in the Life of Melvin Jules Bukiet

Melvin Jules Bukiet

A Manhattan writer runs afoul of the local penal system and lives to tell the tale

Findings: Privacy Revealed

Richard E. Nicholls

From the Archives

The Dispossessed

William Deresiewicz

First we stopped noticing members of the working class, and now we're convinced they don’t exist

THE SCHOLAR AT 75: An Educated Guess

Ted Widmer

Who knew that mixing the intelligent and the idiosyncratic would yield a long life for a certain small quarterly?

Not Compassionate, Not Conservative

Ethan Fishman

A political traditionalist critiques our pseudo-conservative president

Scooter and Me

Nick Bromell

Professing liberal doubt in an age of fundamentalist fervor

Fear of Falling

James McConkey

Working in the mop-and-bucket brigade in college created the perspectives of a lifetime

Glorious Dust

Robert Roper

The posthumous masterwork of an influential black historian tells how slavery itself undermined the Confederacy

Fired

Emily Bernard

Can a friendship really end for no good reason?

Getting It All Wrong

Brian Boyd

The proponents of Theory and Cultural Critique could learn a thing or two from bioculture

Lincoln the Persuader

Douglas L. Wilson

Seeking to get people behind his policies, he made himself the best writer for all our presidents

My Mother’s Body

Mary Gordon

Just remembering her is not enough; resurrecting her is the ultimate goal

Tomorrow Is Another Day

Carol Huang

An Ethiopian student survives a brutal imprisonment by translating Gone with the Wind into his native tongue

Bearing Gifts

Anne Matthews

The Ordinariness of AIDS

Philip Alcabes

Can a disease that tells us so much about ourselves ever be anything but extraordinary?

The Sack of Baghdad

Susannah Rutherglen

The U.S. invasion of Iraq has turned cultural icons into loot and archaeological sites into ruins

Miles from Nowhere

Edward Hoagland

On a return trip to the wilderness of British Columbia, the author revisits a rough and exquisite landscape

Rum and Coca-Cola

Wayne Curtis

The murky derivations of a sweet drink and a sassy World War II song

The Embarrassment of Riches

Pamela Haag

Do not pity me for having more money than anyone I know. Still, wealth does have its mild difficulties

The Case for Love

Natalie Wexler

Did the friendship of an early Supreme Court justice and the wife of a colleague ever cross the line of propriety?

Leaving Race Behind

Amitai Etzioni

Our growing Hispanic population creates a golden opportunity

On the Outside Looking In

Nancy Honicker

Paris and its banlieues in November 2005

Onward, Christian Liberals

Marilynne Robinson

Christianity's long tradition of social injustice

What Jesus Did

Garry Wills

Forget about Christ as secular sage, historical figure, or even as Christian

Two Strangers, Three Stories

James McConkey

All the lonely people and where they come from

Shouldn’t There Be a Word ... ?

Barbara Wallraff

The holes in our language and the never-ending search for words to fill them

The Idea of Bombay

Gyan Prakash

Bollywood epitomized modernity for a boy in a distant province. As an adult, he sees a troubled city.

Henry James vs. the Robber Barons

Gorman Beauchamp

Why Italian art should stay in England, where it belongs, and not fall into the hands of foreigners

The New Anti-Semitism

Bernard Lewis

First religion, then race, then what?

My Holocaust Problem

Arthur Krystal

If we cannot speak of it—though speak of it we must—how do we remember what happened to the Jews of Europe?

Palladio in the Rough

Witold Rybczynski

A South Carolinian builds classical revival houses that really look old

Fadeaway Jumper

Mark Edmundson

A Sunday-afternoon player of a certain age says his farewell to basketball

Flat Time

Robert Finch

The ebb and flow of life in a Newfoundland fishing village

Buster Brown's America

Jiri Wyatt

How a Jew from Slovakia became a Catholic from Manhattan, then fell from grace and turned into a real American

A Visit to Esperantoland

Arika Okrent

The natives want you to learn their invented language as a step toward world harmony. Who are these people?

Teaching the N-Word

Emily Bernard

A black professor, an all-white class, and the thing nobody will say

The Rise and Fall of David Duke

Lawrence N. Powell

Breaking the code of right-wing populism in Louisana

Chekhov's Journey

James McConkey

Finding the ideal of freedom in a rugged prison colony

Custom and Law

Melvin Jules Bukiet

After the death of his father, a not-notably observant Jew turns to the mourning rituals of his faith

Accidental Elegance

Mary Beth Saffo

How chance authors the universe

Genome Tome

Priscilla Long

Twenty-three ways of looking at our ancestors

Roosevelt Redux: Part Two

Thomas N. Bethell

Robert M. Ball and the battle for Social Security

Summer Visitors

Ann Beattie

Buy a house in Maine and they will come. And come.

Roosevelt Redux

Thomas N. Bethell

Robert M. Ball and the battle for Social Security

End Game

Amitai Etzioni

The elderly are entitled to what they have earned

All About Eve

Cynthia Russett

What men have thought about women thinking

A Long Cold View of History

Donald Worster

How ice, worms, and dirt made us what we are today

The Big Roundup

Ted Gioia

John Lomax roamed the West, collecting classic songs from the cowboy era

The Glue Is Gone

Edward Hoagland

The things that held us together as individuals and as a people are being lost. Can we find them again?

So Help Me God

Ted Widmer

What all fifty-four inaugural addresses, taken as one long book, tell us about American history

What We Got Wrong

Lawrence Rosen

How Arabs look at the self, their society, and their political institutions

The Coming of the French

Phyllis Rose

My life as an English professor

The Software Wars

Paul De Palma

Why you can't understand your computer

The Crooner and the Physicist

Jeremy Bernstein

Jacques Brel and The New Yorker profile that never reached critical mass

A Sturdy Man

Brian Doyle

Notes on a human symphony

Sweet Mayhem

Spencer Nadler

0 Replies to “Amitai Etzioni Working At Mcdonalds Full Essay On To Kill”

Lascia un Commento

L'indirizzo email non verrà pubblicato. I campi obbligatori sono contrassegnati *