Writing Workshop Persuasive Essay Answer Key

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Argumentative v. Persuasive Writing

The adoption of college and career-ready standards has included an addition of argumentative writing at all grade levels. Interpreting expectations among the types of argument (e.g., opinion, persuasive, argument, etc.) can be difficult. Begin first by outlining the subtle, but significant differences among them. Download a chart that defines each and their purposes, techniques, components, etc. It's helpful to compare what students already know about persuasive writing as you introduce them to the new and less familiar concepts of argumentative writing.

Within persuasive writing, the author presents one side of a topic or issue. There is little to no acknowledgement of the opposition. That's one of the biggest differences between the persuasive and a more sophisticated argument. It requires the development of both sides of an issue, offering several claims for one side while acknowledging that there are valid counterclaims from the opposition. Argumentative writing is not about winning to "get" something, but rather giving the reader another perspective to consider on a debatable topic.

 

When introducing argumentative writing to students, describe it as a debate on paper--with both sides represented by facts, evidence, and relevant support. It's similar to the closing arguments at the end of a Law & Order episode. Consider showing clips of the closing arguments from various trial scenes. Students have to perform a similar role in their writing; they have to be both the prosecutor and the defense attorney. They have to roll out the key facts of the case, the issue, for both sides. Although they are definitely more for one side, their writing has to include valid points from the other side.

A second strategy to introduce argumentative writing is to reveal two essays on the same topic--one that's written persuasively and one that's written argumentatively. Before writing arguments with two sides represented, they have to be able to identify them in anchor papers. Charge students to read both essays and highlight every sentence as either a claim helping the writer's argument (highlight those sentences in yellow) or a valid counterclaim from the opposition (highlight those sentences in pink). Students will quickly see that argumentative writing is more balanced and offers facts on both sides, whereas persuasive is all me and what I want. (Access two essays on Animal Testing--the black and white handout and the color-coded answer key.) Studying a persuasive and argumentative piece on the same topic helps students see the subtle, but significant differences between them.

For additional interpretation of the argumentative standards at the secondary level, check out the dissection of the middle school and high school Common Core State Standards.

Article originally posted December 14, 2011.

Presentation on theme: "After Reading KEY TRAITS Writing Workshop Persuasive Essay...continued 1.IDEAS 2. ORGANIZATION Presents a thesis statement taking a position on a clearly."— Presentation transcript:

1 After Reading KEY TRAITS Writing Workshop Persuasive Essay...continued 1.IDEAS 2. ORGANIZATION Presents a thesis statement taking a position on a clearly identified issue Uses relevant and convincing evidence to support the position Anticipates and answers opposing arguments and counterclaims Introduces the issue in a memorable and thoughtful way Uses transitional words and phrases to connect ideas Concludes with a summary, a call to action, or both Persuasive Essay

2 After ReadingWriting Workshop Persuasive Essay...continued 3. VOICE 4. WORD CHOICE Uses a tone that is suited to the audience and purpose Reflects a commitment to the writer’s own ideas Uses persuasive language effectively Persuasive Essay KEY TRAITS

3 After ReadingWriting Workshop Persuasive Essay...continued 5. SENTENCE FLUENCY 6. CONVENTIONS Varies sentence beginnings for interest and flow Employs correct grammar and usage Persuasive Essay KEY TRAITS

4 After ReadingWriting Workshop...continued Persuasive Essay What Should I Do? 1. Analyze the prompt. What Does It Look Like? Choose a prompt on page 1064 that interests you. Underline words that state the type of issue you should focus on. Circle words that describe the audience, the purpose, and the format of your writing. Apply the Writing Process: Prewriting

5 After ReadingWriting Workshop...continued Persuasive Essay What Should I Do? 2. List issues that really matter to you. What Does It Look Like? Jot down situations that make you want to take action. Include some comments or questions about each issue. TIP: Be sure that the issue you choose has two sides to some aspect of it. Remember, you need to convince people who disagree with you, not those who have similar views. Apply the Writing Process: Prewriting

6 After ReadingWriting Workshop...continued Persuasive Essay What Should I Do? 3. Draft a thesis statement to guide you. What Does It Look Like? Think carefully about the main point you want to make in your essay. Then state that idea clearly in a sentence or two. Apply the Writing Process: Prewriting

7 After ReadingWriting Workshop Apply the Writing Process: Prewriting Persuasive Essay What Should I Do? 4. Gather background information and evidence. What Does It Look Like? Search the Internet and talk to experts to find facts and statistics related to your position. Think about what your readers already know and what arguments and reasons will convince them....continued

8 After ReadingWriting Workshop Apply the Writing Process: Drafting Persuasive Essay What Should I Do? 1. Organize your arguments. What Does It Look Like? Two ways to organize your arguments are shown. Do you want to present each opposing argument and answer it immediately (Pattern 1) or list all the opposing arguments and then address them as a whole (Pattern 2)? TIP: Think about what claims opponents might make and how you should answer them. For example, nobody favors illiteracy, but some people may disagree about how serious the problem is and what should be done about it....continued

9 After ReadingWriting Workshop Apply the Writing Process: Drafting Persuasive Essay What Should I Do? 2. Make your language persuasive. What Does It Look Like? Keep in mind the connotations of the words you choose. Using words with strong positive or negative connotations shows your commitment to your ideas and stirs your reader’s emotions. See page 574: Persuasive Techniques...continued

10 After ReadingWriting Workshop Apply the Writing Process: Drafting Persuasive Essay What Should I Do? 3. Support your statements with solid evidence. What Does It Look Like? You need to give your readers facts, statistics, and logical reasons to convince them to agree with your position. Be sure to explain exactly how each piece of evidence backs up your ideas....continued

11 After ReadingWriting Workshop Apply the Writing Process: Revising & Editing Persuasive Essay What Should I Do? 1. Correct errors in logic. What Does It Look Like? Read your essay aloud and circle statements that don’t make sense. Revise these statements to be logical and clear. See page 1070: Avoid Errors in Logic...continued

12 After ReadingWriting Workshop Apply the Writing Process: Revising & Editing Persuasive Essay What Should I Do? 2. Energize your language What Does It Look Like? Underline language that is vague or general. Replace these words with specific words that express your strong feelings about the topic. This writer included a testimonial: “I’ve been a tutor and have seen the results myself.” For more examples of testimonials and other persuasive techniques, see page 574....continued

13 After ReadingWriting Workshop Apply the Writing Process: Revising & Editing Persuasive Essay What Should I Do? 3. Answer opposing arguments completely. What Does It Look Like? Ask a peer reader to draw a box around statements that need more explanation. Add details and reasons that help you fully defeat opposing arguments. See page 1070: Ask a Peer Reader...continued

14 After ReadingWriting Workshop Apply the Writing Process: Revising & Editing Persuasive Essay What Should I Do? 4. Strengthen your conclusion. What Does It Look Like? [Bracket] your conclusion. Ask yourself: If I heard or read this message somewhere, would it be enough to convince me? Fine-tune your conclusion. Does it clearly summarize your points? If you make a call to action, is it a strong one?

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